Connecting With Your On-The-Go Investors – The “Mobilegeddon” Update

On April 21 2015, businesses everywhere were watching Google search rankings intently.

It was on this day that Google released an algorithmic update that revolved around mobile-friendly websites. This essentially meant that websites optimized for mobile received a boost in their mobile search results, whereas those that were not mobile-friendly dropped in their overall search rankings.

Hence, the term ‘Mobilegeddon’.

‘Mobilegeddon’ has emerged in various forms since April 21 2015. In May of 2016, ‘Mobilegeddon’ 2.0 was released; this update further increased the rankings of companies with mobile-friendly, optimized websites. Those who invested the necessary time and effort into making their sites mobile-friendly benefited from this update, whereas the businesses that did not follow the mobile-optimized trend were further dropped from the pack.

That’s exactly why we paid closed attention to ‘Mobilegeddon’ in Section 2 of Connecting With Your On-The-Go Investors. Since these updates are so important to public companies, we deemed it as an integral part of our collaborative resource with CIRI.

Here’s what you can expect from Section Two: The ‘Mobilegeddon’ Update.

Although you now know what ‘Mobilegeddon’ is, Section Two will take you through why it was released.

As Google collected web traffic and search data, they realized that more and more traffic was coming from mobile devices, primarily smart phones. To fuel a positive user experience on their network, Google announced the ‘Mobilegeddon’ change. This announcement was made in February of 2015, giving companies just three months to prepare.

Google’s primary focus was to “work towards delivering high quality search results that are optimized” for mobile devices. As traffic to their network was increasing on mobile, the goal of this change was to create seamless user experiences online.

What happened after The ‘Mobilegeddon’ Update?

So, this begs the question – what happened after April 21 2015? What did Google look like on April 22nd?

Content marketing company, BrightEdge, has tracked over 20,000 URLs since the update. They found that there was a 21% decrease in non mobile-friendly URLs on the first 3 pages of search results.

Similarly, a search by s360 showed that mobile friendly websites have received 32% more organic mobile traffic than non-mobile friendly websites.

Could you imagine receiving 32% more traffic to your website, simply because you made the decision to optimize your website for mobile?

What does it mean for my public company?

connecting with your on-the-go investors mobilegeddon

68% of investors look at investor related content throughout the day on their mobile device, which means that nearly three quarters of traffic to your website could be coming from mobile. If your website isn’t mobile-friendly, not only will it be slammed by ‘Mobilegeddon’, your user experience will start to decline from the very moment that a potential investor visits your website.

‘Mobilegeddon’ had a significant impact on the websites of public companies, many of which are still feeling such impact on their search rankings. In an effort to help public companies with their website’s user experience, we made sure to include Section Two: The ‘Mobilegeddon’ Update in Connecting With Your On-The-Go Investors.

With Section Two: The ‘Mobilegeddon’ Update reviewing what you need to know about Google’s change in April of 2015, we’ll follow-up next week with an overview of Section Three: Examples of Mobile-Friendly Websites.

 

7 Ways To Test The Mobile-Readiness Of Your Website

We’ve talked about how important it is to have a mobile friendly website, but how do you know if your website is truly mobile-ready?

It’s a loaded question, and one we’re here to answer. Although your website might appear to look fine on mobile, it might not be truly optimized. And since 48% of consumers start mobile research with a search engine (with this stat growing month over month), it’s important that your company focuses on mobile fast.

That’s why we’re here to show you how you can find out if your website is ready for mobile.

So let’s get started. Here’s are 7 ways you can test the mobile-readiness of your website

Mobile-Readiness of Your Website 1

1. Open your website in a browser.

Yes, this test requires a desktop computer.

For this test, open your company’s website in a browser. This method is often referred to as a “three second test”, and here’s why:

With your mouse, grab the right side of your browser window and drag it all the way to the left until you can’t shrink it any further.

Is content cut off? Or can you scroll and view content without an issue? Do you have to maximize the page to view content again?

If content fits within your screen and you can scroll properly, this is a great sign.

 

Mobile-Readiness of Your Website 2

2. Test your website’s mobile load speed.

Click on this link and enter your company’s URL in the text box.

We love this offering from Google; they’ve developed a website that tests your URL to see if it’s mobile friendly, or if it’s not quite responsive.

 

Mobile-Readiness of Your Website 3

3. Open your website in your mobile browser and begin to test forms.

Since a contact form is the most important part of your website (after all, how are prospective clients supposed to contact you without it?) it’s important to ensure that forms are responsive on mobile.

Open your “Contact” page and view the form through your smartphone. Is it responding properly? Can you fill information easily?

 

4. Check your site speed.

Another great tool from Google is the Site Speed Test.

To get started, click here and, just like the mobile-readiness test, enter your company’s website URL.

This tool is truly great. In addition to speed scores, it will give you detailed information on what you should fix and the things you’ve done correctly. It will also give you a speed test for mobile and desktop.

 

Mobile-Readiness of Your Website 5

5. Review your content placement.

Even if your website is optimized for mobile structurally, it’s important that your content reflects your mobile focus.

By this, we mean that your content hierarchy should reflect how you want your web visitors to interact with your website. This can be referred to as the beginning of a “Buyer’s Journey”.

Ask yourself:

  • Are the most important Call-to-Actions the first thing investors see on mobile?
  • Is all text easy to read?
  • Are all Call-to-Action buttons easy to click? Do you understand exactly where the button will lead you?

When reviewing your website, make sure that your content is placed in a way that makes sense for visitors.

 

Mobile-Readiness of Your Website 6

6. Send this to your developer or agency…

mobiReady has a great (and extensive) test around everything JavaScript, CSS, HTML and more.

It’s easy to use, and we recommend working with your development team or agency to go through this process.

 

Mobile-Readiness of Your Website 7

7. Get our Mobile Optimization Guide.

If these first tips helped you, consider downloading our Mobile Optimization Guide here. This guide is extensive, and is a great resource for your team to use as you are going through the process of reviewing your website.

Since 83% of investors rely on mobile when it comes to work, it’s more important than ever to test the mobile-readiness of your website. Ask yourself – would you want a potential client experience frustration while interacting on your website? Can you afford to have a potential client leave your website because of a slow load time? We are assuming that the answer is resoundingly “no”.

 

7 Reasons Why Public Companies Can’t Afford to Miss Out on Mobile

When companies the size of Apple make announcements, the whole world listens. And, in fact, the whole world changes. Remember when the initial reaction to the iPad was resoundingly negative? (It was even referred to as the “big yawn”, courtesy of Business Insider). Fast-forward six years, and Apple has sold over 282 million of the tablet devices, all the while making way for competitors like Samsung to create their own version of the iPad.

The same can be said for Google. When Google released the first round of, what was quickly referred to as “Mobilegeddon”, the whole world knew they needed to listen. And when the second round of “Mobilegeddon” was released this past year, it was another reminder that Google truly sets the rules of anything and everything to do with how people will find and access your company’s website.

What is “Mobilegeddon”?

On April 21 2015, Google released a mobile-friendly ranking algorithm that impacted businesses around the world. Ultimately Google decided that, if your website was not mobile-friendly, your search ranking would be negatively impacted. This means that if your business and a fellow public company competitor both had stellar websites, but yours was mobile-friendly and theirs wasn’t, your company would show up higher in mobile Google searches.

Make sense?

In this algorithm, there are no degrees of mobile-friendliness. You either are, or you aren’t.

Why does this matter?

Simply put, not having a mobile-friendly website for your public company could break your business online. We hate to be the bearer of bad news, but it’s true. Read why below.

So here’s why public companies can’t afford to miss out on mobile…

public companies can't afford to miss out on mobile 1

1. You’re putting the future of your company’s online presence at risk.

Without a mobile-friendly website, your company will suffer in Google search rankings. As both Apple and Google have well demonstrated in the last six years, it’s time to pay attention to the big players in the game for your business to truly take advantage of your online strategy.

(As a side note, we have a handy checklist to determine if your website is mobile-friendly. Give it a spin here.)

public companies can't afford to miss out on mobile 2

2. Mobile use has skyrocketed.

It’s true.

Mobile now represents 65% of digital media time, which means that the desktop is now a secondary touch point.

Now, that’s not to say that your business can forget about desktop, but if a potential 65% of your target audience is on mobile, wouldn’t you want to speak to them?

public companies can't afford to miss out on mobile 3

3. Investor interaction is all about mobile.

If you caught yourself thinking, “yeah, yeah – but those 65% are all Millennials or even teenagers,” from our last statistic, think again.

68% of investors view investor-related content each and every day through their mobile device.

Your target audience.

public companies can't afford to miss out on mobile 4

4. Emails are primarily read on mobile devices.

Do you catch yourself skimming through an email on mobile, only to click off into link-land to other websites and platforms?

That’s because over 67% of email is opened on a smartphone device. That’s well over half of each and every email that is sent and received every single day.

So, if your company is sending newsletters or issuing press releases, it’s important to ensure these are mobile optimized, too. And if you’re driving traffic back to your site, having a website that is mobile-friendly is key.

Since 67% of email is opened on smartphone devices, more email read on phones will translate to more mobile page views, making your user experience integral to your online strategy.

public companies can't afford to miss out on mobile 5

5. Website design instills trust.

According to a Stanford study, 75% of us admit to making judgments about a company’s credibility based on the design of their website.

So, can you imagine a potential investor arriving on your website through their smartphone, only to find that they can’t engage or interact with your content because it’s not mobile-friendly?

public companies can't afford to miss out on mobile 6

6. Speedy sites make for happy visitors.

Imagine if your website took forever to load? Fingers crossed this isn’t the case for your company (and if it is, click here).

Content that’s above the fold (the first content you see when you land on a site) on mobile should load in under one second. You can take a speed test here.

Speedy sites make for happy visitors, which means that these visitors are more likely to stay on your site and make their way to more pages on your website.

public companies can't afford to miss out on mobile 77. Responsive websites will set your business for the future.

One of the greatest benefits of responsive web design is that the site is designed to look good on any screen size, not designed specifically for a certain monitor or device. What does this mean? In the future, as new devices are released, your responsively designed website will still be set up for success.

 

Having a mobile website for your public company is no longer simply a nice feature; rather, it is a necessity and literally impacts the growth of your business online. As more and more investors are visiting your website to learn about your company, you truly can’t afford to miss out on the mobile experience.

5 Best Practices for CSR On Your Website

We’ve talked about how important corporate social responsibility (CSR) is for your company, and even various elements that should be included when you’re telling your story online, but, when you’ve made the decision to move forward with CSR storytelling (high five, by the way), what are the best practices for CSR pages on your website?

Thankfully, we’ve done the work for you.

Most companies are practicing a form of corporate social responsibility with the overall goal of contributing to their community. The storytelling aspect, however, has changed over the last decade; companies have felt increased pressure to “dress up” CSR and that they need to be delivering every single aspect of every single initiative on their website.

We’re here to tell you that you don’t. We believe that CSR activities should be expressed online in a way that focuses on the fundamental goal of aligning your company’s community projects and initiatives with its business purpose and values, making your CSR endeavours easy to consume online – not difficult to understand.

So, how can your company do it?

We’ve pulled together five of the best CSR websites online now, while providing best practices that will help you stand apart from your competition.

5 Best Practices for CSR On Your Website

1. Ensure that it’s mobile-friendly. Example: Cisco

We love Cisco’s mobile, tablet and desktop-friendly CSR website. It’s easy to navigate, it’s responsive, and it’s worked well on every device we’ve tested.

It’s important to have a mobile-friendly website for investors. 83% of mobile users say that a seamless experience across all devices is very important to their browsing habits, and it’s even more important when a potential investor is arriving to your website.

teck best practices for csr

2. Include a dedicated blog. Example: Microsoft Green Blog

When you’re putting together your CSR section or dedicated website, consider the power of a blog.

Microsoft Green is committed minimizing their environmental impact, so they’re working with partners around the world to focus on a sustainable, low-carbon future for our planet. On their website, Microsoft writes frequently about related topics such as Earth Day, press releases, and company events.

A dedicated CSR blog allows you to focus on internal and external activities as a business, giving you the ability to showcase authenticity and differentiate yourselves from competitors.

best practice csr - microsoft

3. Keep your CSR reports visible. Example: IBM

It’s important to have CSR report downloads from both current and past years in a visible, easy-to-navigate place on your website. This makes the research experience simple for visitors, including investors, and decreases the possibility of high bounce rates.

IBM does it right. The company has two clear navigational drop-downs on their homepage, with one being “Our Reports”. It’s easily found, providing a strong browsing experience.

IBM

4. Pull out the “big wins”. Example: Disney

We love how Disney pulls the “big wins” and displays it on the Philanthropy section of their website.

Disney isn’t afraid to display the massive 23.1 million books donated figure on their homepage, or 333.3 million in giving throughout 2015. Instead of including every single aspect on their site, Disney pulls only the statistics that matter most and have the most impact.

For your business, highlight the big wins; pull 2-3 key statistics that you’re proud of, instead of paragraph upon paragraph from your latest community event. With read rates and time on site lower than ever, you must attract visitors quickly.

disney

5. Make your purpose clear. Example: Google Green

When a visitor lands on your CSR site, there should be no question what the focus and goals of your programs are. Included in this should be your history, business, and overall economic impact of your CSR endeavours.

Google Green knocks this out of the park with their website. When landing on Google.ca/Green, a visitor knows that Google is committed to supporting resource efficiency and renewable power.

Google Best Practices for CSR

Conclusion

From building mobile-friendly sites to celebrating big wins, it’s important to have a CSR section or website that is focused on delivering the key information to the end user – whether it’s the investor or the customer. Too often, we see companies make the mistake of having the CSR site serve the purpose of Executive or Leadership groups, without taking user experience into consideration. With these 5 best practices for CSR on your website, your business will be equipped with the tools you need to break apart from the competition in Corporate Social Responsibility.