7 Ways To Test The Mobile-Readiness Of Your Website

We’ve talked about how important it is to have a mobile friendly website, but how do you know if your website is truly mobile-ready?

It’s a loaded question, and one we’re here to answer. Although your website might appear to look fine on mobile, it might not be truly optimized. And since 48% of consumers start mobile research with a search engine (with this stat growing month over month), it’s important that your company focuses on mobile fast.

That’s why we’re here to show you how you can find out if your website is ready for mobile.

So let’s get started. Here’s are 7 ways you can test the mobile-readiness of your website

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1. Open your website in a browser.

Yes, this test requires a desktop computer.

For this test, open your company’s website in a browser. This method is often referred to as a “three second test”, and here’s why:

With your mouse, grab the right side of your browser window and drag it all the way to the left until you can’t shrink it any further.

Is content cut off? Or can you scroll and view content without an issue? Do you have to maximize the page to view content again?

If content fits within your screen and you can scroll properly, this is a great sign.


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2. Test your website’s mobile load speed.

Click on this link and enter your company’s URL in the text box.

We love this offering from Google; they’ve developed a website that tests your URL to see if it’s mobile friendly, or if it’s not quite responsive.


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3. Open your website in your mobile browser and begin to test forms.

Since a contact form is the most important part of your website (after all, how are prospective clients supposed to contact you without it?) it’s important to ensure that forms are responsive on mobile.

Open your “Contact” page and view the form through your smartphone. Is it responding properly? Can you fill information easily?


4. Check your site speed.

Another great tool from Google is the Site Speed Test.

To get started, click here and, just like the mobile-readiness test, enter your company’s website URL.

This tool is truly great. In addition to speed scores, it will give you detailed information on what you should fix and the things you’ve done correctly. It will also give you a speed test for mobile and desktop.


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5. Review your content placement.

Even if your website is optimized for mobile structurally, it’s important that your content reflects your mobile focus.

By this, we mean that your content hierarchy should reflect how you want your web visitors to interact with your website. This can be referred to as the beginning of a “Buyer’s Journey”.

Ask yourself:

  • Are the most important Call-to-Actions the first thing investors see on mobile?
  • Is all text easy to read?
  • Are all Call-to-Action buttons easy to click? Do you understand exactly where the button will lead you?

When reviewing your website, make sure that your content is placed in a way that makes sense for visitors.


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6. Send this to your developer or agency…

mobiReady has a great (and extensive) test around everything JavaScript, CSS, HTML and more.

It’s easy to use, and we recommend working with your development team or agency to go through this process.


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7. Get our Mobile Optimization Guide.

If these first tips helped you, consider downloading our Mobile Optimization Guide here. This guide is extensive, and is a great resource for your team to use as you are going through the process of reviewing your website.

Since 83% of investors rely on mobile when it comes to work, it’s more important than ever to test the mobile-readiness of your website. Ask yourself – would you want a potential client experience frustration while interacting on your website? Can you afford to have a potential client leave your website because of a slow load time? We are assuming that the answer is resoundingly “no”.